Revised Edition of Perfect Bound Coming Soon!

I am happy to announce Perfect Bound: Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro has been updated and revised!  This has been a long time in the making, and I’m thrilled to be able to provide my readers with the most current information possible.

Cover reveal: The revised edition of Perfect Bound
Cover reveal: The revised edition of Perfect Bound

The 2019 edition of this multi-award-winning guide features:

  • New exercises for choosing your path to publication
  • Condensed and updated guidance on e-book companies
  • Updated cost information and new resources to explore
  • In-depth discussions of hybrid publishing, Instagram, and barcodes
  • A new interview with Janell Robisch, a designer and e-book formatter

And so much more!

Sign up for my newsletter and be the first to know when it publishes!

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Copyright Tips and Tidbits: How and When to Register, How to Format Your Notice, and What Not to Do (Updated)

Self-publishers, take note: While it’s true that you hold an inherent copyright to your work just for the fact that you wrote it, should anyone try to infringe on your copyright you will be best served by registering with the US Copyright Office (www.copyright.gov). That may sound intimidating, but it is actually a fairly straightforward process.

How to Register

Start by going to the US Copyright Office website. The Copyright Office accepts both online and paper applications, and the applications come with easy-to-understand instructions. The filing fee (as of 2019) is $55 for online registration and $85 for hard copy.

In addition to the application and the filing fee, you will be asked to provide a copy of the “deposit” — what the Copyright Office calls the work to be registered. If you file electronically you can send an electronic file or a hard copy of your work; file with paper and you  have to send a hard copy. (The Copyright Office prefers online applications, but you are not bound by that.)

The application itself is easy to follow and there is an extensive FAQ section to answer questions. Read the instructions carefully and you can complete the online form in less than 20 minutes.

When to Register

You can register your book either before or after publication. Although simple, it can be a lengthy process, as getting the certificate can take nearly four months for the electronic application and nearly seven months for paper applications. During particularly busy times, those lags can be even longer.

The good news is, unless you have reason to believe you will not be granted copyright, you don’t have to wait until you receive your certificate before publishing the work. The date of registration is the date the office receives the completed application, not the date you receive your certificate. Still, copyright registration is not something you want to let slip through the cracks. I would recommend beginning earlier rather than later.

Upon publication, if you have a print book, submit a hard copy to be held in the Library of Congress.

What Not to Include

When you apply for copyright, you are making a public record. That means anyone can view the information you supply. The Copyright Office website offers this pointed advice:

Personally identifying information, such as your address, telephone number, and email address, that is submitted on the registration application becomes part of the public record. Some information will be viewable in the Copyright Office’s on‑line databases that are available on the Internet. For this reason, you should provide only the information requested. Please do NOT provide any additional personal information that is not requested, such as your social security number or your driver’s license number.

As identity theft is a real problem in this country, heeding this advice only makes sense.

How and Where Your Copyright Notice Should Appear

Your copyright notice belongs on the reverse of the title page in your book. A valid copyright notice includes the word “Copyright” or the symbol “©”; the year of registration; and the copyright holder’s name, in that order:

© 2020 Katherine Pickett

Some publishers choose to use both the word and the symbol for copyright as well as the word “by” — Copyright © 2020 by Katherine Pickett — but that is not required.

Pitfall: Preregistration vs. Registration

The Copyright Office provides the option of “preregistration” for works that have not yet been completed. (Important: This is separate from registration of unpublished works.) The fee for preregistration is a whopping $140. I suspect this fee is intended to be a deterrent, as even the Copyright Office notes that preregistration is not helpful for most people. Rather, preregistration is recommended only for those who meet these two criteria:

  1. You think it is likely someone will infringe on your copyright before the work is made public, and
  2. The work isn’t finished.

Note also that even if you preregister, you will still need to go through the registration process. Except in extreme circumstances, you will most likely want to register your work rather than preregister it.

 

Print

 

Like this blog? Find more advice and insights in Perfect Bound: Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro, Revised Edition. Coming soon!

Copyright Tips and Tidbits: How and When to Register, How to Format Your Notice, and What Not to Do

Self-publishers, take note: While it’s true that you hold an inherent copyright to your work just for the fact that you wrote it, should anyone try to infringe on your copyright you will be best served by registering with the US Copyright Office (www.copyright.gov). That may sound intimidating, but it is actually a fairly straightforward process.

How to Register

Start by going to the US Copyright Office website. The Copyright Office accepts both online and paper applications, and the applications come with easy-to-understand instructions. The filing fee (as of 2015) is $35 for online registration and $85 for hard copy.

In addition to the application and the filing fee, you will be asked to provide a copy of the “deposit” — what the Copyright Office calls the work to be registered. If you file electronically you can send an electronic file or a hard copy of your work; file with paper and you  have to send a hard copy. (The Copyright Office prefers online applications, but you are not bound by that.)

When to Register

You can register your book either before or after publication. Although simple, it can be a lengthy process, as getting the certificate can take nearly three months for the electronic application and nearly six months for paper applications. During particularly busy times, those lags can be even longer.

The good news is, unless you have reason to believe you will not be granted copyright, you don’t have to wait until you receive your certificate before publishing the work. The date of registration is the date the office receives the completed application, not the date you receive your certificate. Still, copyright registration is not something you want to let slip through the cracks. I would recommend beginning earlier rather than later.

Upon publication, if you have a print book, submit a hard copy to be held in the Library of Congress.

What Not to Include

When you apply for copyright, you are making a public record. That means anyone can view the information you supply. The Copyright Office website offers this pointed advice:

Personally identifying information, such as your address, telephone number, and email address, that is submitted on the registration application becomes part of the public record. Some information will be viewable in the Copyright Office’s on‑line databases that are available on the Internet. For this reason, you should provide only the information requested. Please do NOT provide any additional personal information that is not requested, such as your social security number or your driver’s license number.

As identity theft is a real problem in this country, heeding this advice only makes sense.

How and Where Your Copyright Notice Should Appear

Your copyright notice belongs on the reverse of the title page in your book. A valid copyright notice includes the word “Copyright” or the symbol “©”; the year of registration; and the copyright holder’s name, in that order:  © 2015 Katherine Pickett

Some publishers choose to use both the word and the symbol for copyright as well as the word “by” — Copyright © 2015 by Katherine Pickett — but that is not required.

Pitfall: Preregistration vs. Registration

The Copyright Office provides the option of “preregistration” for works that have not yet been completed. (Important: This is separate from registration of unpublished works.) The fee for preregistration is a whopping $140. I suspect this fee is intended to be a deterrent, as even the Copyright Office notes that preregistration is not helpful for most people. Rather, preregistration is recommended only for those who meet these two criteria:

  1. You think it is likely someone will infringe on your copyright before the work is made public, and
  2. The work isn’t finished.

Note also that even if you preregister, you will still need to go through the registration process. Except in extreme circumstances, you will most likely want to register your work rather than preregister it.

 

Like this blog? Find more advice and insights in Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro, available through Hop On Publishing, Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, Left Bank Books, and other retailers

Book-Publishing Talk and Signing This Saturday!

Marylanders, take note: If you missed my book launch event earlier this month, you have another chance! And this time, there’s a freebie involved.

This Saturday, September 27, I will be at Novel Books (23330 Frederick Road, Clarksburg, MD 20871)  speaking about Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro and the state of book publishing today.

Stop by and you could win a seat at my November workshop for you or a friend. The event starts at 10 a.m. All are welcome. I hope to see you there!

Novel Books Flier

The Wrap-Up: Launching Perfect Bound

THANK YOU to everyone who made the launch of Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro such a success!  Although not everything went according to plan, we had little to complain about.

The big bang we were hoping to make on September 1 was more like the sound of a pop gun, but we made up for it on the 2nd. The publication of two meaty articles (on the websites Live Write Thrive and Publishing Perspectives) garnered us some much-appreciated attention, and at 11:30 on Wednesday night, we discovered we had hit the Amazon bestseller list for Editing Reference!

Speaking at Kensington Row Bookshop Sept 5, 2014
Speaking at Kensington Row Bookshop, Sept 5, 2014

Two other articles that were expected to publish by then had not yet surfaced, and it turned out there was some miscommunication. The Writer Beware article published Friday instead of Tuesday, and the excerpt on Jane Friedman’s blog pubbed the following Monday instead of Wednesday, but publish they did, and we again saw immediate returns. For those writers who have been following along, blog tours really are worth the effort.

Another highlight came Wednesday when veteran editor Katharine O’Moore-Klopf, who has much more experience than I, contacted me about the book. After reading the sample chapter available on the Hop On website, she bought the book and wrote an impromptu blog post recommending Perfect Bound as a continuing-ed book for editors. We were thrilled!

The launch parties at Kensington Row Bookshop in Kensington, Maryland, and Left Bank Books in St. Louis, Missouri, were great fun and also well worth the investment. On both nights we surpassed our modest sales goals and, more important, were able to celebrate with friends, colleagues, and newcomers alike. I was even able to meet my designer, Sue Hartman, for the first time. We had worked together off and on for 15 years and never met until now!

Speaking at Left Bank Books
Speaking at Left Bank Books, Sept 11, 2014

Those who attended can attest that my daughter stole the show. She was a trooper, staying up well past her bedtime to help her parents celebrate and enjoy the moment. I loved getting to share the night with her.

There is much more to come from Hop On Publishing. A webinar is scheduled for next week, another talk and signing on the 27th at Novel Books, and a trip to Rehoboth Beach for a workshop October 4. This week we are catching our breath and soaking in what we have achieved.

To everyone who attended the events, bought the book, listened to our stories, let us stay at their home, held the baby, chased the baby, or otherwise sent good vibes our way,

THANK YOU!

Launch Day Is Here! — Updated

Nothing goes as planned. Find out what changed and get the live links to all the happenings from last week and this one.

We Made It!

Today is the official launch of Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro and we couldn’t be more excited! To celebrate, we have a blog tour and special events scheduled all week and throughout the month of September. Here’s a roundup:

Monday (9/1): “Easy Tips to Help You Save Money on That Necessary Edit,” guest blog post hosted by Susanne Lakin at Live Write Thrive

Tuesday (9/2): “5 Steps to Increasing Your Book’s Marketability with Research,” article published by Publishing Perspectives (Tuesday’s Featured Article)

Thursday (9/4): “How to Be a Good Client,” article published by Walrus Publishing

Friday (9/5): “Author-Editor Workability: The Crucial Element for a Successful Editing Experience,” guest post on Writer Beware

Kensington Row EventFriday Night: Launch Party at Kensington Row Bookshop, 3786 Howard Ave., Kensington, MD 20895, 6 to 9 p.m. Come out for a night of food, fun, and books! All are welcome.

Monday (9/8): Excerpt from Chapter 3 of Perfect Bound, “Looking at the Big Picture: Manuscript Development,” published by Jane Friedman

Excerpt from Chapter 2 of Perfect Bound, “To Sign or Not to Sign with an Agent,” published by Vonnie Winslow Crist.

Thursday (9/11): We travel to St. Louis for the Midwest book launch at Left Bank Books, 399 N. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63108, 7 to 10 p.m. Again, all are welcome.

At the end of the month, Saturday, September 27, I will be having a book signing at Novel Books in Clarksburg, MD. Attendees can enter to win 25% off my next workshop.

This has been an amazing journey. We at Hop On send a heartfelt “Thank You!” to everyone who has helped us, especially the publishing professionals and authors who were interviewed for the book, as well as our family, friends, and colleagues. The book wouldn’t be what it is without you!

Get your copy of Perfect Bound through any of these booksellers:

page-0Hop On Publishing, a division of POP Editorial Services

Amazon.com

Barnes and Noble

Kobo

Left Bank Books

Also available through iBooks, Gardners, Novel Books, and other sites around the web!

What You Can Expect from Your Designer, and What Your Designer Expects from You

Excerpt from Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro, by Katherine Pickett

For many writers, the design part of book publishing is mystifying. This excerpt from the chapter “Making It Look Good: Design and Layout” sheds some light on what to expect and what is expected of you when working with a designer.

What You Can Expect from Your Designer

Professional designers offer an expertise that most literary types don’t have: they know what it takes to make a book visually appeal­ing. That includes a wide range of aspects, from choosing appro­priate artwork (photo or illustration), colors, and fonts for your subject area or genre to knowing the best spacing to use on chapter- opening pages and where to place the page numbers and running heads. Further, your designer will be able to locate the correct art­work and, if you are self-publishing, may be able to help you secure licenses for using the art. For the traditionally published author, the publishing house most often takes care of licensing.

You can also expect your designer to understand good lay­out principles. That means knowing how to “twin” pages—that is, make sure that the tops and bottoms of facing pages align—and fix bad breaks. It also includes making adjustments to spacing, hyphenation, and justification to ensure that the last page of a chapter has enough lines of text (at least six lines is optimal; four is passable) and that there are no blank right-hand pages.

The design sample shows you how the interior of your book will look after layout.
The design sample shows you how the interior of your book will look after layout.

When it comes to choosing the design for your book, your designer will do his or her best to represent your ideas. It is helpful if you have specific ideas to share, rather than vague notions, but also be sure to listen to your designer if he or she is gently nudging you in a certain direction. The designer may have reasons for his or her ideas that you aren’t aware of, and, in my experience, if you don’t ask your designer’s opinion, you won’t get it. The designer will give you what you asked for, even if it isn’t his or her first choice.

If you are self-publishing, you will work directly with your designer to come up with design ideas that are appropriate for your book. Your designer will listen to your ideas and attempt to convey your vision for the book through the cover and interior designs. Although you may use a different interior designer and cover designer, or possibly a template interior and a custom cover design from your designer, you will achieve a more seamless look if the same person does both designs. Template interiors work best with all-text books such as novels, where it is unlikely that a lot of adjustments will need to be made. Self-publishing advocate Joel Friedlander sells templates for Microsoft Word through his web­site (www.thebookdesigner.com), while some designers offer tem­plates at a savings compared to a custom design.

Those working with traditional publishing houses should recall that although they have input on the cover and interior designs for their books, they very rarely get final approval. That means you can give your opinion, but you are not likely to get everything you want.

What Your Designer Expects from You

As mentioned, authors who have signed with a traditional publish­ing house will have little direct contact with the designer. There­fore, designers do not have many expectations from these authors specifically. Nevertheless, for all authors, a good working relation­ship with a designer requires a collaborative mind-set.

Designers working with self-publishers expect their clients to have an opinion about what the design should be. If you have researched the competition ahead of time, you are in great shape, as you probably already have thoughts on what you like and what you don’t. Designers are the creative minds, however, and do best with a little freedom. That is to say, if you let them, good designers will take your ideas, add a few of their own, and bring you two or three design options that look great and fit your needs. If you have not formulated your thoPerfectBound by Katherine Pickettughts on how your book should look—for example, you have not researched the competition and therefore do not know what the conventions are for your genre—your designer will have to come up with something all on his or her own. This may work out great, but it also may happen that although you did not know how to verbalize what you like, you did indeed have an opinion, and the designer has missed the mark. This will result in many back-and-forths that could have been eliminated if you had done some research beforehand. Conversely, if you know precisely what you want, down to the last detail, you leave your designer with no room to be creative. You may get exactly what you want, but you lose the advantage of having hired an expert, and what you want may not be what is best for the marketability of the book. Looking through other books to find the designs you like may take a bit of time, but it’s also a lot of fun. It means your idea for a book is getting closer to reality.

When it is time for layout, be organized. Your manuscript file should be clean and ready to go, and your artwork and captions should be numbered and organized. A “clean” manuscript is free of extra spaces between words or sentences, free of extra paragraph breaks, and free of extra tabs. The entire file is double-spaced and in one standard font, such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Courier New. All text is “normal”; there are no random style sheets applied via Microsoft Word. And any queries from the copyeditor have been removed, with all tracked changes accepted. If you supply your manuscript this way, the designer can focus on more import­ant issues and you will receive your page proofs that much faster.

Like this blog? Check out Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro, available through Hop On Publishing, Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Left Bank Books, and other retailers.

Nearing the End of the Road to Publication

As of this past Monday, preorders for Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro have opened. That puts me a huge step closer to the end of the publishing journey.

We at Hop On Publishing are excited to have gotten this far. It’s been nearly two years since I sat down to write my first draft, and in that time, the book has gone through some major restructuring. The final product is tight, clear, and dynamic — something I can really be proud of.

Starting in February I began charting my progress through the publishing process with this blog. Living it was educational, and writing about it gave me perspective on what had happened, how far I had come, and just how far I had to go.

You can get the details on my successes and failures with the following posts. I hope my experience will make yours easier:

How I Chose My Path to Publication

Manuscript Development

Copyediting and Query Resolution

Cover and Interior Design

Page Proofs and Sending Final Files to the Printer

There is one more stage of production that I didn’t cover and that is conversion to ebook. It’s a simple enough process — you upload your files to your chosen ebook company, some magical conversion takes place, and you are presented with ePub and mobi files for use on a Nook, Kobo, iPad, Kindle, or other e-reader of your choice. It’s simple, but not always easy. The magic only happens if your files are prepared correctly, so make sure you and your designer have followed the relevant instructions as closely as possible.

To learn more about Perfect Bound, visit www.hoponpublishing.com. To preorder your copy, click here.

Good luck on your own writing journey!

Road to Publication: The Design Process

UPDATE — May 15, 2014

We have a final cover!

The final front cover with endorsement
The final front cover with endorsement

 

Originally published April 29, 2014

If you’ll recall, I left off last time having successfully navigated the copyediting stage of book production. For four weeks the manuscript for Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro had been with the copyeditor, which was a welcome break from the revisions I had been doing. However, I wasn’t completely off the hook. The book still demanded much of my attention.

The same day I sent the manuscript to the copyeditor, I sent another copy of it to the designer. I had hired a woman I have worked with in the past on other books (not my own).  From that experience, I knew she had done great work on books similar to mine. My husband, Chris, was involved in the entire design process, and after reviewing the designer’s online portfolio, he agreed she would be a good fit. We requested a quote, and it came back within budget. We were set.

The manuscript had the design elements coded so that the designer would know what level the different headings were intended to be. The book has four kinds of boxes, and each kind received its own set of codes as well. I also sent a design memo explaining what my vision was for the overall tone and feel of the book:

I’m looking for something calm, clean, and friendly. This is a how-to for new authors who are likely overwhelmed with everything they need to know about book publishing. I don’t want anything too big or bold that will add to their anxiety.

I included the format (paperback and e-book), trim size (6 x 9), desired/expected page count (208), and pub date (September 2014). I then detailed what I did and didn’t like in other designs, providing links to competitors for reference.

I also gave my thoughts on the cover design:

I would like to have a road theme (photo or illustration) on the cover to set up the Pothole and Roadside Assistant elements inside. In addition to the title and subtitle, I was thinking about having four bullets on the front cover to distinguish this book from the 75 other books on publishing a book that are out now. Perhaps you can give me some guidance on whether or not that will look good.

My first choice was a little cramped.
My first choice was a little cramped.
Chris's first choice was gray and pointy.
Chris’s first choice was gray and pointy.

Ten days later I received the first set of cover designs. There were three, and to be honest, I wasn’t that thrilled with any of them. I was expecting to be wowed, unable to choose because they were all so good, but that wasn’t the case. There was one that I really liked, but Chris thought it looked cramped, and the one he liked I thought was too pointy and gray. After a lengthy discussion we gathered our thoughts and I e-mailed the designer with our ideas for revisions. All of the covers had photos, so we also asked to see one with an illustration.

By the end of the week we had five more covers to consider. For the revised covers, one was much improved, another I found just as underwhelming as I had the first go-round, and the third, well, the third was an example of too many cooks in the kitchen. Sometimes when you try to tweak a design, you end up with a muddled mess. That’s what we got. The one I had originally liked best was now tied for last place.

The one I almost ran away with
The one I almost ran away with didn’t match the tone.

However,  there was one I absolutely loved! It was so fun and vibrant and welcoming. It was a funky illustration that I thought captured my friendly personality better than the others had. It needed a couple of tweaks, but all in all, I was ready to run away with it. My husband liked it, too, and even if he didn’t, he knew it was going to be hard to talk me out of it.

Shortly before bed, however, he made a comment that I really had to consider. “Do you think that cover conveys the tone of the book?” I was dismayed. There was nothing wrong with the cover. It was great! But . . .

He might have a point, I thought. I slept on it and when I awoke, I realized he was right. Instead, the one I had marked as the runner-up turned out to be the one that best fit the book.

PerfectBound-cov1-600x900
The final cover showing the final subtitle

With the cover finally decided, we were able to really jump into the interior design.

I received the first sample and again, I was a bit underwhelmed. My desire for calm and clean had definitely been taken to heart. But this time, the revisions went much faster. To spruce things up, we incorporated the cover image into the chapter opener, enlarged the chapter-opening box to make it more prominent, and fixed the spacing on the A-heads.  I also asked for some different artwork for the Pothole subchapters, a different style of bullet for the bulleted lists, and a few other small adjustments. In ten days from start to finish, we had a final interior design.

The full design process took roughly six weeks, and I realize now that I should have started discussions about the cover before I even sent the manuscript to the copyeditor. However, with the copyeditor needing an extension and my final revision of the manuscript taking longer than I expected, we actually ended up with the final manuscript file and the final design coming together at the same time. We now have page proofs. I’ll tell you all about it  . . . next time.

P.S. We just received an outstanding review and have decided to add an excerpt to the front cover. Looks like the final, FINAL cover is still to come!

Also in this series

MS2BK: The Road to Publication

MS2BK: Manuscript Development

MS2BK: How I Chose My Path to Publication

MS2BK: Copyediting

Like this blog? Check out Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro, available through Hop On Publishing, Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Left Bank Books, and other retailers.

MS2BK: How I Chose My Path to Publication

Self-publishing isn’t right for every person or every book. It is, however, right for me. Here’s how I made my decision.

Like many people, I started by assessing my strengths in relation to the requirements of traditional publishing.

I previously posted a brief quiz to help authors assess their strengths and weaknesses and consider how those factor into a decision about the right publishing path. Those same ten questions are what helped me decide my own route to publication.

My Quiz Responses

1. Do you have at least $5,000 that you can dedicate to your book project?

Yes

2. Do you want complete creative control regarding the text, layout, and cover design of your book?

That’s not essential but it would be nice.

3. Do you have unquestionable credentials in your field, such as a degree or many years of experience?

Yes; 15 years as an editor with experience on all sides of the business.

4. Do you have a very narrow, targeted niche or cause?

No.

5. Are you willing to give up some creative control in order to make a living as a writer?

No, that is not my goal.

6. Do you want a book under your name but would rather have someone else take care of the details of publication?

No, I want to be involved.

7. Do you have the contacts, or are you willing to make contacts, with professionals who can help you publish a book on your own?

Yes, definitely.

8. Do you have a book idea with national appeal?

Yes.

9. Do you have a national marketing platform already in place?

No.

10. Do you want your book to be published in less than a year?

No.

Although I answered yes to some of the key questions regarding traditional publishing, without that critical marketing platform, I knew finding a publisher was going to be a difficult journey for me.

I also  knew there was a lot of competition in my field. Without a nationally recognized name for myself, explaining how my book is different from the dozens of other books on publishing a book was going to be a challenge for me or any agent I might find. (There is a definite need for the book I am writing, but I won’t go into that now.)

But I had other strengths that made self-publishing more attractive.

Two important factors in self-publishing success are (1) a strong connection to your audience, and (2) connections with people who can help you throughout the publishing process. As a member of several associations for writers, editors, and publishers, and as a 15-year veteran of the industry, I meet both criteria. I also have knowledge of marketing best practices and a general understanding of the business of publishing, both of which will go a long way to ensuring a smooth journey.

My goals for the book also played a role in the decision-making process. I’m not looking to get rich from this endeavor. I want to put out a quality product that supports my editing company and educates my authors. I am willing to put forth the capital in order to do that. I also know that even with a traditional publishing house, I would be doing most if not all of the marketing for the book. I can do that just as well when operating as a self-publisher.

What about the other routes to publication?

The other publishing routes that I outlined in that quiz — collaboration with a nonprofit or business, work-for-hire, and facilitated self-publishing — do not fit my needs or desires. My niche isn’t tight enough for a collaboration; I’m not looking to make a living as a writer, which would make work-for-hire attractive; and I don’t need a publishing services company to arrange the publication of my book. I’ve been guiding other people’s books through the production process for most of my career.

Ultimately, I decided I don’t need the support of a traditional publishing house to make my book. I am happy to take the risks and reap the rewards of self-publishing.

Since I have the resources — in the form of money, people, and skill — I have chosen the route that gives me the most control, the most freedom, and the ability to make a product that meets my highest standards of quality.

So far it has been an exciting ride. The manuscript is prepped for design and is almost ready for copyediting. Stay tuned to hear how those challenges turn out.

Like this blog? Look for Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro, coming Fall 2014.